Monday, October 20, 2014

Swiss Chard Frittata Recipe -- not a vintage post

When I started this blog I vowed to keep it about vintage finds and what I do with them.  Not family, not travel, not decorating, not pets, not FOOD.  But I'm rationalizing that this is a follow up to a spring blog about incorporating vintage items into my yard.  I took a photo of the tiny Swiss Chard Bright Lights that I had just planted in a vintage washtub.   They grew up to be so STUNNING.  I really wasn't even planning on eating them, but why not?  They will just freeze in a couple weeks if I don't.

Some of the leaves are assorted colors, or have assorted colors
running through their veins.
The stems are primarily yellow, fuchsia, red.

I rolled the leaves to cut them into strips.
Chiffa...something.

The stems are used too, cut into about 1/4" lengths.

I have a friend with chickens, and I had to show off
her beautiful eggs.

It looks pretty darn close to the picture, doesn't it?
It was super yummy, here is the recipe:
 
SWEET POTATO & SWISS CHARD FRITTATA
 
6 large eggs                     1 cup 1/2 & 1/2                  1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp pepper                  2 cups 1/2" cubed sweet potatoes
2 T olive oil                     2 cups chopped swiss chard or kale
1/2 small onion, chopped                                           2 minced garlic cloves
3 oz goat cheese, crumbled (feta or mozzarella pearls would be good)
 
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Saute sweet potatoes in hot olive oil for 10 minutes (recipe says to use non-stick ovenproof skillet, but I used my mom's old cast iron skillet). Cook until potatoes are tender and golden ( about 10 minutes).  Add the swiss chard, onion and garlic.  (I cheated and threw dehydrated onion in with my eggs). Saute 3 or 4 minutes until the swiss chard is wilted and onion softened.  In large bowl whip eggs, 1/2 & 1/2, S&P with fork.  Pour evenly over vegetables.  Sprinkle with cheese. (I used mozzarella pearls because my small town grocery store doesn't have goat cheese.) Bake at 350 degrees for 15-20 minutes, until set.  Recipe came from Country Living 9/2014.



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